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Notes tagged “web design”

Bookmarked https://gomakethings.com/progressive-enhancement-the-new-hotness/. “All users, when possible, should get …

Bookmarked https://gomakethings.com/progressive-enhancement-the-new-hotness/.

All users, when possible, should get a basic “minimum functionality” as part of the HTML file. Then, you can progressively layer in enhancements through your CSS and JavaScript.

If the CSS or JS fail, the user still gets a usable, albeit less flashy, experience.

Progressive Enhancement, the New Hotness™
gomakethings.com

Bookmarked https://css-tricks.com/replace-javascript-dialogs-html-dialog-element/. But … I do. Also, they …

Bookmarked https://css-tricks.com/replace-javascript-dialogs-html-dialog-element/.

But … I do. Also, they look pretty good in modern Firefox/Chrome.

So why don’t I—or really any other web developer—use [alert(), confirm(), or prompt()]?

Replace JavaScript Dialogs With New HTML Dialog | CSS-Tricks
css-tricks.com

Tailwind is, like, the complete opposite of the …

Tailwind is, like, the complete opposite of the CSS Zen Garden of yore. The latter was about fully redesigning a site without ever having to touch its HTML—only thing that changed was a single stylesheet. The former lets you redesign a site by altering all of its markup (while leaving the stylesheet untouched).

Love the renewed attention for “classless” CSS frameworks, …

Love the renewed attention for “classless” CSS frameworks, but I’m gonna keep calling them CSS—or browser—resets. (Just kidding—nah, I’m serious—but this is how I’ve been approaching web design for the longest time. Doesn’t mean I’m somehow against “component-based design,” by the way. [That said, I rarely need more than a handful of classes beyond microformats, “the simplest way to mark up structured information in HTML.”])

Also, quoting from Jeremy Keith’s “Robustness and Least Power”:

> Choose the least powerful language suitable for a given purpose.

Robustness and least power
adactio.com